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Make Your Home a Happy Home

What's in the course?

  • Gentle Parenting introduction.
  • Strategies to prevent tantrums and outbursts.
  • Techniques to keep your cool during difficult parenting moments.
  • How to discipline your child so they learn to desire to do the right thing.

 

Gentle Parenting is the long term discipline strategy so many parents are longing for. If you feel like tradition punishments just don't work, you'll be excited to learn the strategies that do. Gentle Foundations will teach you how to discipline with love and respect, without becoming a permissive parent.

Lizzy Mash, Course Creator

What's in the course?

  • Gentle Parenting introduction.
  • Strategies to prevent tantrums and outbursts.
  • Techniques to keep your cool during difficult parenting moments.
  • How to discipline your child so they learn to desire to do the right thing.

 

Gentle Parenting is the long term discipline strategy so many parents are longing for. If you feel like tradition punishments just don't work, you'll be excited to learn the strategies that do. Gentle Foundations will teach you how to discipline with love and respect, without becoming a permissive parent.

Lizzy Mash, Course Creator

(This post might contain affiliate links, which means if you happen to buy a product I love then I may get a commission - at no extra cost to you! For all the Ts and Cs go here.)

The 1 Question That Makes Me a Better Mom

by | Apr 3, 2018 | Motherhood | 0 comments

I love being a mom, isn’t it great? Some days it can be a bit much, whether you’re in the thick of potty training or dealing with teenage emotions.

Becoming a better mom definitely feels like a lifelong journey. I know I’ll probably never be a perfect mom, but I always want to become a better and better mom.

Life with a toddler can be pretty crazy at times, but I have learnt there is 1 question to ask myself that makes me a better mom.

And that question is,

 

WHAT’S THE WORST THAT CAN HAPPEN?

I once started to notice that I was worrying too much about what my daughter was doing and it was becoming excessive.

I was always quickly reacting to get her to stop what she was doing and I wasn’t being sensitive to her feelings and interests. She would be doing something that was slightly unsafe or maybe a little gross.

One thing that happened a lot is she would start to pull trash out of the kitchen garbage can. When I would see her doing this I would instantly react, and even though I would use Gentle Parenting approved positive language, I was pretty abrupt in my response to her behaviour.

I wanted to change this but for some reason I was really worked up about her touching the garbage.

But then one day I took a step back and asked myself, “What’s the worst that could happen if she pulls out the trash?”

Well, knowing there isn’t anything dangerous like broken glass or anything in the garbage, I knew that the worst that could happen is maybe she would get coffee grounds on her hands, and in that case we would wash them.

Really not a big deal actually.

Now of course this doesn’t mean I started to allow her to play in the garbage, but it meant I could slow down my reaction. The extra time it would take me to calmly redirect her would just be some extra seconds, and nothing horrible was going to happen in that time.

Finally, I could relax because I realized an abrupt reaction wasn’t necessary.

If my daughter was in a very dangerous situation where the extra 15 seconds it took me to react calmly would result in physical harm then I would definitely react abrupt instead. Then it would be a real matter of safety, but often times our toddlers are getting close to danger but they’re still far from it. In those cases we should slow down.

Slow reactions make easy transitions

When we can react slowly and calmly to our child it makes the transition for them to do something else much easier. If we abruptly run over to our child and rip their hands off what they’re doing and pick them up and move them it happens really fast for them.

One second they’re having some fun and the next second they’re somewhere else, not even sure of what happened.

Imagine being halfway through a BuzzFeed article and someone rips your phone out of your hands and throws it across the room.

Maybe the have a reason they don’t want you to read it, maybe it has a spoiler for your favourite TV show, but in that moment you’re not going to think about the WHY behind what they’re doing, you’re thinking about the WHAT that they did.

If they came over to you and were like, “Hey, there’s a spoiler in there I don’t think you want to read,” it would be a lot easier for you.

We should respect our kids and their feelings, and when we help them to calmly move from one activity to another it will be a really easy transition for them.

When we demand instant obedience we don’t give children the chance to change their behaviour on their own.

So with my daughter and the garbage can.

This is how this usually goes.

“Oh, honey you’re touching the garbage…The garbage is very dirty and full of germs. If possible, can you please take your hands off the garbage? …. Oh, it looks like you need my help so I’m going to take your hands off for you. Ok, now remember it’s ok to look at and smell the garbage…You are still trying to touch the garbage so why don’t we go play somewhere else.”

I intentionally give her opportunities to do the desired action on her own, and when necessary I respectfully step in and help her. I don’t get upset that she didn’t listen because I did not expect her to do exactly what I wanted on her own. Instead of controlling, I coached.

And I am able to do this because I know that the worst that could happen in that extra time is that she could get coffee grounds on her hands.

I ask myself “what is the worst that could happen” and that makes me a better mom.

This is all part of my Gentle Parenting strategy

I use Gentle Parenting (read all about that here) to train my brain to be more peaceful and to treat my daughter with the respect she deserves. It has really taught me to slow down and to start to see things from her point of view. I have been working with children for years, all around the world, and I know that positive discipline and Gentle Parenting WORK! 

If you want to get started with other Gentle Parenting strategies sign up below for my free course, Gentle Foundations for Parenting, to transform your family with positive discipline. This course is a perfect first start into Gentle Parenting. Everyday for a week I’m going to send you a quick crash course email to equip you with the skills needed to get started with Gentle Parenting in your home. Sign up below!

The Moving Mama

The Moving Mama

Lizzy Mash is an experienced early childhood educator now living in Africa as a missionary working with children and families.

She teaches Christian moms how to take a more respectful and Christ-like approach to motherhood by using Gentle Parenting strategies.

Read more about Lizzy here >>

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